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Posts Tagged ‘Craig Orndorff’

IMG_1670On Saturday, February 9th, the seven Republican candidates for lieutenant governor gathered for their second forum in Virginia’s sixth district, this time in Middletown, a small town in Frederick County.  The Apple Valley Club, the Republican Women of Shenandoah County, and the Shenandoah Valley Constitutional Conservatives hosted the event.  Suzanne Curran was the moderator and Karen Kwiatkowski kept the time.

The forum began with opening statements from the office seekers, an introduction that lasted for about an hour.  After about a twenty-minute break, Ms. Curran asked a battery of questions on a whole host of topics.  Unlike the previous event in Lynchburg, all of the candidates had an opportunity to answer each of the questions.  It was common for the respondents to exceed their allotted time window; Ms. Kwiatkowski shook a cowbell to silence the candidates once his or her time had expired.  In a particularly amusing moment, Pete Snyder bowed to the bell when it rang for him.

Many of the topics explored at the Middletown forum were the same issues that had been discussed at the last event.  For the most part, it was difficult to differentiate among candidates.  Although their delivery differed, all of them claimed to be conservative; each is supposedly pro-life, each supports the 2nd Amendment, and each decries the erosion of the Constitution and the massive overreach of the federal government.  The only noticeable exception was when Jeannemarie Devolites Davis announced her support of background checks at gun shows.  Presumably, the longer that the seven remain relatively indistinguishable, the bigger bump the E. W. Jackson campaign should receive.  After all, Jackson’s fantastic oratory skills are perhaps the greatest advantage he enjoys over the other six.

However, as the title of this article indicates, there were some moments of particular interest as the forum drew to a close.  Delegate Scott Lingamfelter and Corey Stewart took a few jabs at each other as Stewart blamed the General Assembly for many local problems and for lacking courage while Lingamfelter responded claiming that local government ought to shoulder more of the responsibility.  Given their roles in local and state government, both Chairman Susan Stimpson and State Senator Steve Martin were drawn into fight, though Martin seemed to try to stay above the fray.

Pete Snyder’s closing remarks filled me with some small message of hope as he reminded the audience that if you have love in your heart, just about anything is possible.  Also, at the end of the event Delegate Lingamfelter seemed to make it a point to speak with me personally and ask for my support.  Whether he read my last post chastising him for his remarks about Ron Paul is uncertain, but I do appreciate his willingness to try to mend fences.

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Corey Stewart

In general, most of the candidates appeared a bit more polished at the Middletown event and I did not catch any major gaffes.  However, given his willingness to make bold statements such as claiming that the phrase “I introduced a bill” is almost useless in politics, I believe that Corey Stewart emerged as the clear winner at the forum in Middletown.  I won’t say that I agree with every single position that he articulated, but the idea of nominating a candidate who is willing to call out his or her fellow Republicans is exceedingly important.  Even though I’m admittedly still jaded by his anti-Paul piece, for going toe-to-toe with Stewart, Lingamfelter claimed second place.

To all of the candidates, I would recommend making every effort to stand out in the sea of seven, clearly articulating how your positions are different and better than the rest; failure to do so may mean that soon you will be forgotten.

Fellow blogger Craig Orndorff recorded the entire forum and you can find this video here!  Watch and decide for yourself.

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This morning, citizens across Virginia awake to a day much like any other.  The sun has risen, the temperature is fairly warm, and life proceeds steadily onward.  The politicos among us, still weary from the toils of yesterday, look to the results of Election Day and are instilled with either hope or dread depending on one’s perspective.  So what are the results?

The biggest topic is the Virginia Senate.  So far, the Republican Party has netted one seat with Bill Stanley’s narrow win over Roscoe Reynolds in the 20th district.  The 17th district is still too close to call with Republican Bryce Reeves currently enjoying a 136-vote lead over incumbent Edd Houck.  It seems very likely that a recount in that district is coming soon.

Although the GOP has made gains, it certainly isn’t the slam-dunk that many conservative and Republican activists had hoped.  Assuming Houck emerges victorious, the Democrats will retain control of the Senate.  If Reeves wins, then the chamber will be evenly split with Republican Lt. Governor Bill Bolling likely casting the deciding tie-breaking vote in many circumstances.

One question that has troubled me throughout the campaign is, assuming the Republicans gain control of the Senate (or have a 20-20 tie), who will lead the party in that chamber?  Will it be a fiscal, social, and constitutional conservative?  Or will it be someone in the mold of former Senator John Chichester?  Even though I’ve been told by several sources that we will not return to such days, unless the GOP chooses a leader based on conservative principles, and not merely on seniority, I remain concerned.

Before moving on to the other races, I believe it is important to recognize that conservatives could have made their gains greater, but they spread their resources too thinly.

Looking at the unofficial results, the GOP ran pretty close campaigns in the 1st, the 33rd, the 36th, the 37th, the 38th, and the 39th.  However, the party devoted efforts to wide range of other races and thus ended up short in so many places.  As Bearing Drift stated in the most recent issue of their magazine, the 36th and the 38th districts leaned Republican and yet both were lost.  If money and volunteers were used in a wiser fashion, would the GOP now have a 21 or 22-seat majority instead?  To use a sports analogy, why gamble so much and swing for a homerun when a simple base will win (or at least tie) the game?

Here at home, Republican Bryan Hutcheson will be the new Sheriff of Harrisonburg and Rockingham County.  Even though the city was close, Hutcheson captured an amazing 66% of the vote in the county.  Congratulations to Mr. Hutcheson and his campaign team for their decisive win.

Moving north, Craig Orndorff emerged the top vote getter in the four-way race for Soil and Water Conservation Director in Shenandoah County.  Best wishes to him in his new position.

With the House of Delegates firmly in Republican hands, not too much attention has been given to that chamber.  However, given my ties with a particular House of Delegates seat, the last area of interest is the 93rd district.  As I mentioned previously, this district became a little more Republican after redistricting.  Mike Watson of Williamsburg capitalized on shift by defeating freshman Delegate Robin Abbott of Newport News.

Over all, things haven’t changed too much here in Virginia.  I’m sure pundits from both sides of the aisle will spin the results to declare victory for their cause boldly stating that either President Obama has been repudiated or vindicated.  Personally, I don’t think this election demonstrated a huge shift, but rather serves as another testament to Virginia’s conservative-leaning principles.

As the ink begins to dry on Election Day 2011, we prepare for 2012.  Given the limited space on my car, today is the annual ritual of bumper sticker removal.  So long Delegate Wilt and Senator Obenshain.  I expect to see both your names on my vehicle for the 2013 cycle.

The ceaseless political battle continues again soon.  But, for the moment, let’s come together as Virginians united and savor a respite.  The time for reflection and introspection is at hand.

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In about a week, Virginians have the opportunity to elect delegates, state senators, sheriffs, and a whole host of city and county officers.  Although most contests are uncontested here in the Shenandoah Valley, I want to draw your attention to one race in Shenandoah County.

Two newcomers are challenging the incumbents for spots for Soil and Water Conservation Director in the Lord Fairfax District.  I believe that Craig Orndorff is a candidate who deserves your support.

I’ve known Craig for a good many years now through our mutual involvement in valley politics and the blogosphere.  On my last trip to Shenandoah County, I had the opportunity to hear Mr. Orndorff speak about this position he is looking to fill, and let me tell you that I was impressed.  He possesses a very strong knowledge about the duties and responsibilities of the director and has a multitude of ideas for improvement over the current system.  He also demonstrates a real passion to expand both the openness and accountability of this position, two traits that are sorely needed at every level of government.

I encourage you to watch this video to learn a bit more as to why you should support Craig Orndorff for Soil & Water Conservation Director:

Although I cannot vote for him considering that I don’t live in Shenandoah County, I strongly recommend that my readers, friends, and neighbors who call the county home support him next Tuesday.

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Yesterday morning, dozens of activists gathered for a meeting of the Shenandoah Valley Constitutional Conservatives at the Denny’s in Mount Jackson.  Although the group seemed to focus on a lot of issues of importance to Shenandoah County, there were several people who made the journey even though they lived outside the county.  The event hosted hopefuls for a variety of countywide offices including sheriff, commonwealth’s attorney, and soil and water conservation director.  Republican U.S. Senate candidate Jamie Radtke was the featured speaker of the day.

This opportunity was the first chance I’ve had to listen to Mrs. Radtke in person.  She covered a considerable range of topics.  Although I recorded a portion of her speech, I did not capture it in its entirety.  Fortunately, fellow blogger and soil & water conservation director candidate, Craig Orndorff (On the Western Banks of the Shenandoah & Shenandoah Sunshine Project) was gracious enough to provide me with the full video.  I hope you get a chance to watch for yourself so that you can get a fairly comprehensive understanding of one of our choices for Senate.

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